Cedar Waxwings could survive solely off of fruit

Updated: Sep 17, 2019


Jeff Tift, Cedar Waxwing



Cedar Waxwings were named after the Cedar berries which they often consume throughout the winter season. These birds usually live in the woods along streams where there are plenty of fruiting plants throughout the United States and Canada. Males and females look similar and their feathers include a combination of colors: a brown to black ombre leading from their heads to their backs and a pale peachy yellow underneath.The distinct black mask on their face makes them a wonderful subject for painting. While mating, they will scoot towards one another, sometimes touching their bills together. One sub-species is named the Bohemian waxwing which differs slightly through its color and size. The bird is gray all over except for some peachy tones near the black mask on its face and is fairly larger than the average Cedar Waxwing. Some artists who have used this bird as a subject include Jeff Tift and Ryan Berkley. Tift aims to preserve nature through his artwork by emphaszing its natural beauty. Berkley created a series for an artshow in Oregon showcasing various birds dressed up in human outfits. There is a relatively low conservation effort for waxwings and their population has even increased in some areas.

Artworks mentioned:

http://www.artlicensing.com/content/cedar-waxwing

https://www.audubon.org/magazine/november-december-2014/reimagining-cedar-waxwing

Sources:

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Cedar_Waxwing/

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bohemian_Waxwing/id


Ryan Berkley, Cedar Waxwing

written by Kaitlan Norman

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